Pickled Cabinet Aviary in a Funeral Home
Natures World Handmade Furniture Aviarium / Aviary Bird Cage / Case
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Features
-Double Pane Glass
-Removable Tray
-Air Filtration System
-Timed Lighting System
-Climate Control System

Styles
-Queen Ann
-Chippendale
-Elegance
-Simplicity
-Cabinet

Sizes
-Consolette
-Studio
-Baby Grand


Finish
-Mahogany
-White Lacquer
-Black Lacquer
-Natural Oak
-Pickled

Pricing
Video
Testimonials

aviary and bird Questions we get asked

  1. What do I receive when I purchase an Aviarium?

  2. What types of birds typically live in the Aviarium?
  3. I have a bird from the parrot family. Is an Aviarium designed for them?

  4. Where are the majority of Aviarium on display?

 

Hand-Crafted Aviarium

When you purchase an Aviarium, you are purchasing something truly unique. We only manufacture about two a week. We believe this adds to the unique nature of our product. Each unit comes complete with:
-Timed Lighting
-Temperature Control
-Air Filtration System
-Double Pane Glass Design (easy cleaning without disturbing the birds)

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Accessories included with your Aviarium

-Nests, Greenery, Flowers and Perch
-Food Tray, Clear Waterer and Bird bath
-Corn cob for bedding, Special Bird Seed Mixture, Millet Stalks

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Birds are included with your Aviarium!

When you purchase an Aviarium, there is nothing else to purchase! You have a complete bird home that includes birds! Each Aviarium comes with a pair of Society Finches. We also have many other finch types available. See the birds that we raise.

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Delivery & Setup

When you purchase an Aviarium, we come on-site to deliver & setup your new bird furniture. This is a service that we believe keeps us in touch with you, our customer, and ensures a satisfied customer with your lifelong investment.

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Lady Gouldian Finches

Lady Gouldians were originally found in the northern savannah region of Australia. It is a strikingly colorful bird with most having a purple chest, yellow breast and green back. Easily sexed, females are duller than males when they become adults. The juveniles are olive, grey and brown until their first moult when they display their adult coloration.

John Gould, discoverer of the Lady Gouldian finch, was so impressed by the bird’s gorgeous plumage that he named it the ‘Lady Gouldian finch’ after his late wife. The Lady Gouldian is also known as the rainbow finch.


Care and Feeding: Lady Gouldians are easily kept in good health on a diet of a high quality finch mix. Occasionally giving them spray millet and an eggfood mix will keep them healthy and give them extra energy. They will need an adequate supply of fresh, clean water changed at least every other day. A good rule of thumb is if the water does not look clean enough for you to drink then change it.
Breeding: The hen lays 5 to 8 small white eggs and parent birds share incubation duties. The eggs hatch in approximately 13 to 17 days. The hatchlings have grey and brown colored down. The young birds fledge at approximately 22 days and the parents will start to wean babies around 40 days. The young birds should not be removed from their parents until they have been out of the nest at least four weeks.

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Society Finches

Society finches are a hybrid developed in China in the 1700s. They were never found in the wild. They come in a variety of colors. This is the most domesticated of all finches and so is often used to foster chicks of more difficult species.

The society finch is sexually monomorphic meaning both the male and female look the same. The only way to visually sex them is to hear the male sing. The society finch will sleep in the nest even when not breeding. It is not unusual for 8 to 10 society finches to all sleep in the same nest. They also will sit on other birds eggs and find the other birds young. Society finches help to reduce stress on the other birds when raising young. They get along well with other finches.

Care and Feeding: Society finches are easily kept in good health on a diet of a high quality finch mix. Occasionally giving them spray millet and an eggfood mix will keep them healthy and give them extra energy. They will need an adequate supply of fresh, clean water changed at least every other day. A good rule of thumb is if the water does not look clean enough for you to drink then change it.

Breeding: The hen lays 6 to 8 small white eggs and parent birds share incubation duties. The eggs hatch in approximately 14 to 17 days. The young birds fledge at approximately 20 days. The young birds will be fully independent at 40 days. The young birds should not be removed from their parents until they have been out of the nest at least four weeks.

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Cordon Bleu Finches

Cordon Bleus were originally found in Africa in savannah, thorn, scrub, dry bush, and cultivated areas where surface water is available. The main types of Cordon Bleus are blue-breasted, blue capped, and red cheeked.

Not only is this delightful waxbill loved for its blue coloring, unusual in birds, but also for its lovely song. They get along well with most other finches. The main distinguishing feature on the Blue-breasted Cordon is that it has no red cheek patch, and the mandible is more bluish tending to purple. The blue is slightly less intense on a female and less extensive, particularly around the facial area.

Care and Feeding: Cordon Bleus are easily kept in good health on a diet of a high quality finch mix. Occasionally giving them spray millet and an eggfood mix will keep them healthy and give them extra energy. They will need an adequate supply of fresh, clean water changed at least every other day. A good rule of thumb is if the water does not look clean enough for you to drink then change it.

Breeding: The hen lays 4 to 6 small white eggs and parent birds share incubation duties. The eggs hatch in approximately 11 to 14 days. The hatchlings have skin and fawn colored down. The young birds fledge at approximately 18 days and the parents will start to wean babies around 40 days. The young birds should not be removed from their parents until they have been out of the nest at least four weeks.

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American Singer Canaries

In the mid 1930s, a group wanted a bird that had a louder voice than the German Roller. They decided that the appearance of the Scots Border canary was the best for their purpose. The Border, however, has a very loud, choppy song. The American Singer is about 2/3 Roller and 1/3 Border. Its song is sweet, not too loud, not too soft, pleasing to the ear, with plenty of variety. Only the male American Singer will sing so this makes sexing easy.

Care and Feeding: Canaries are easily kept in good health on a diet of a high quality finch mix. Occasionally giving them spray millet and an eggfood mix will keep them healthy and give them extra energy. They will need an adequate supply of fresh, clean water changed at least every other day. A good rule of thumb is if the water does not look clean enough for you to drink then change it.
Breeding: The hen lays 3 to 6 small eggs and generally the female takes care of the incubation duties. While a good male will help feed the female. The eggs hatch in approximately 12 to 14 days. The hatchlings have grey and brown colored down. The young birds fledge at approximately 16 days. The young birds should not be removed from their parents until they have been out of the nest at least four weeks.

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I have a bird from the parrot family. Is an Aviarium designed for them?

Yes. We do make a slight modification to keep the inside wood protected from the chewing habits of the Parrot.

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Funeral Homes

Q: What is the purpose of a funeral?
A: Funerals are an important step in the grieving process, as well as an opportunity to honor a life lived. They offer surviving family members and friends a caring, supportive environment in which to share thoughts and feelings about the death. Often funerals are the first step in the healing process. To learn more, visit the "Why a Funeral?" section of this Website.

Q: What role does the funeral director fill?
A: Funeral directors are there to help you through a very difficult time in your life. They are listeners and counselors, tribute planners and crisis managers. Through discussions with you, based on information you share about your wishes and details about your loved one, they are able to offer guidance and help you coordinate a very personal tribute that honors the life of your loved one. Your local NFDA funeral director can guide you through planning the service; complete necessary paperwork; and coordinate doctors, ministers, florists, newspapers and other vendors to make your funeral experience as seamless as possible. But they also listen to your stories about your loved one, answer your questions on grief, link you to support groups and recommend sources of professional help. By acting as an experienced source for support and guidance, a professional, ethical funeral director can provide you with relief during one of your greatest times of need.



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Frequently Asked Questions about Assisted Living


What is Assisted Living?

Assisted Living

The new housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care in a warm, dignified, community setting.

What is Assisted Living?

The Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) defines an Assisted Living residence as a special combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs -- both scheduled and unscheduled -- of those who need help with activities of daily living.

What is the philosophy of Assisted Living?

ALFA members subscribe to a 10-point philosophy of care:

Offering cost-effective quality care that is personalized for individual needs
Fostering independence for each resident
Treating each resident with dignity and respect
Promoting the individuality of each resident
Allowing each resident choice of care and lifestyle
Protecting each resident's right to privacy
Nurturing the spirit of each resident
Involving family and friends, as appropriate, in care planning and implementation
Providing a safe, residential environment
Making the Assisted Living residence a valuable community asset
Who lives in Assisted Living residences?

Currently, more than a million Americans live in an estimated 20,000 Assisted Living residences. Assisted Living residents can be young or old, affluent or low income, frail or disabled. A typical resident is a woman in her eighties and is either widowed or single. Residents may suffer from Alzheimer's disease or other memory disorders. Residents may also need help with incontinence or mobility.

What does an Assisted Living residence look like?

Assisted Living residences can range from a high-rise apartment complex to a converted Victorian home to a renovated school. Residences may be free standing or housed with other residential options, such as independent living or nursing care. They may be operated by non-profit or for-profit companies. Most facilities have between 25 and 120 units. There is no single blueprint, because consumers' preferences and needs vary widely. Units may vary in size from one room to a full apartment.

How is Assisted Living regulated?

Regulations and licensing regulations vary from state to state contributing to the wide range of senior housing models considered Assisted Living. Most providers and their staff have special training as a result either of state requirements or company policy. Some states require special staff certification and training. Residences must comply with local building codes and fire safety regulations. ALFA believes the most successful regulations are consumer drive, balancing the safety concerns we all share with the consumers' desires to retain their independence and freedom of choice.

What types of services are offered in Assisted Living residences?

Services provided in Assisted Living residences usually include:

Three meals a day served in a common dining area
Housekeeping services
Transportation
Assistance with eating, bathing, dressing, toileting and walking
Access to health and medical services
24-hour security and staff availability
Emergency call systems for each residents unit
Health promotion and exercise programs
Medication management
Personal laundry services
Social and recreational activities
What about costs?

Costs vary with the residence, room size, and the types of services needed by the residents. Across the nation, daily basic fees range from approximately $15 to $200 -- generally less than the cost of home health services and nursing home care. A basic Assisted Living fee may cover all services or there may be additional charges for special services. Most Assisted Living residences charge month-to-month rates, but a few residences require long-term arrangements.

Who pays the bill for an Assisted Living residence?

Residents or their families generally pay the cost of care from their own financial resources. Depending on the nature of an individual's health insurance program or long-term care insurance policy, costs may be reimbursed. In addition, some residences have their own financial assistance programs. Government payments for Assisted Living residences has been limited. Some state and local governments offer subsidies for rent or services for low income elders. Others may provide subsidies in the form of an additional payment for those who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicaid. Some states also utilize Medicaid waiver programs to help pay for Assisted Living services.